The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition By Paul Horowitz And Winfield Hill

The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf By Paul Horowitz And Winfield Hill

Download Free The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf By Paul Horowitz And Winfield Hill

Introduction: The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf

The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf By Paul Horowitz, The transistor is our most important example of an “active” component, a device that can amplify, producing an output signal with more power in it than the input signal. The additional power comes from an external source of power (the power supply, to be exact). Note that voltage amplification isn’t what matters, since, for example, a step-up transformer, a “passive” component just like a resistor or capacitor, has voltage gain but no power gain. Devices with power gain are distinguishable by their ability to make oscillators, by feeding some output signal back into the input.
It is interesting to note that the property of power amplification seemed very important to the inventors of the transistor. Almost the ‘first thing they did to convince themselves that they had really invented something was to power a loudspeaker from a transistor, observing that the output signal sounded louder than the input signal.

The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf Chapters and Sections:

Table Of Contents For The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf

CHAPTER 1
FOUNDATIONS
introduction: The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf

Voltage, current, and resistance
Voltage and current
Relationship between voltage and current: resistors
Voltage dividers
Voltage and current sources
Thevenin’s equivalent circuit
Small-signal resistance
Signals
Sinusoidal signals
Signal amplitudes and decibels
Other signals
Logic levels
Signal sources
Capacitors and ac circuits
Capacitors
RC circuits: V and I versus time
Differentiators
Integrators
Inductors and Transformers
Inductors
Transformers
Impedance and reactance
Frequency analysis of reactive circuits
Refilters
Phasor diagrams
“Poles” and decibels per octave
Resonant circuits and active filters
Other capacitor applications
ThCvenin’s theorem
generalized
Diodes and diode circuits Diodes Rectification
Power-supply filtering
Rectifier configurations for power supply
Regulators
Circuit applications of diodes
Inductive loads and diode protection
Other passive components
Electromechanical devices
Indicators
Variable components
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 2
TRANSISTORS

Introduction: The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf
First transistor model: current amplifier
Some basic transistor circuits
Transistor switch
Emitter Follower
Emitter followers as voltage regulators
Emitter follower biasing
Transistor current source
Common-emitter amplifier
Unity-gain phase splitter
Transconductance
Ebers-Moll model applied to basic transistor circuits
Improved transistor model: transconductance amplifier
The emitter follower revisited
Biasing the common-emitter amplifier
Current mirrors
Some amplifier building blocks
Push-pull output stages
Darlington connection
Bootstrapping
Differential amplifiers
Capacitance and Miller effect
Field-effect transistors
Some typical transistor circuits
Regulated power supply
Temperature controller
Simple logic with transistors and diodes
Self-explanatory circuits
Good circuits
Bad circuits
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 3
FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS

introduction: The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf
FET characteristics
FET types
Universal FET characteristics
FET drain characteristics
Manufacturing spread of FET
characteristics
Basic FET circuits
JFET current sources
FET amplifiers
Source followers
FET gate current
FETs as variable resistors
FET switches
FET analog switches
Limitations of FET switches
Some FET analog switch
examples
MOSFET logic and power switches
MOSFET handling
precautions
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Bad circuits

CHAPTER 4
FEEDBACK AND OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS

introduction: The Art Of Electronics 2nd Edition Pdf
Introduction to feedback
Operational amplifiers
The golden rules
Basic op-amp circuits
Inverting amplifier
Noninverting amplifier
Follower
Current sources
Basic cautions for op-amp circuits
An op-amp smorgasbord
Linear circuits
Nonlinear circuits
A detailed look at op-amp behavior
Departure from ideal op-amp performance
Effects of op-amp limitations on circuit behavior
Low-power and programmable op-amps
A detailed look at selected op-amp circuits
Logarithmic amplifier
Active peak detector
Sample-and-hold
Active Clamp
Absolute-value circuit
Integrators
Differentiators
Op-amp operation with a single power supply
Biasing single-supply ac amplifiers
Single-supply op-amps
Comparators and Schmitt trigger
Comparators
Schmitt trigger
Feedback with finite-gain amplifiers
Gain equation
Effects of feedback on amplifier circuits
Two examples of transistor
amplifiers with feedback
Some typical op-amp circuits
General-purpose lab amplifier
Voltage-controlled oscillator
JFET linear switch with RoN compensation
TTL zero-crossing detector
Load-current-sensing circuit
Feedback amplifier frequency compensation
Gain and phase shift versus frequency
Amplifier compensation methods
Frequency response of the feedback network
Bad circuits
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 5
ACTIVE FILTERS AND OSCILLATORS

Active filters
Frequency response with RC filters
Ideal performance with LC filters
Enter active filters: an overview
Key filter performance criteria
Filter types
Active filter circuits
VCVS circuits
VCVS filter design using our simplified table
State-variable filters
Twin-T notch filters
Gyrator filter realizations
Switched-capacitor filters
Oscillators
Introduction to oscillators
Relaxation oscillators
The classic timer chip: the 555 Voltage-controlled oscillators
Quadrature oscillators
Wien bridge and LC
oscillators
LC oscillators
Quartz-crystal oscillators
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 6
VOLTAGE REGULATORS AND POWER CIRCUITS

Self-explanatory circuits

Basic regulator circuits with the Circuit ideas
The 723 regulator
Positive regulator
High-current regulator
Heat and power design
Power transistors and heat sinking
Foldback current limiting
Overvoltage crowbars
Further considerations in high current power-supply design
Programmable supplies
Power-supply circuit example
Another regulator ICs
Precision op-amp design techniques
Precision versus dynamic range
Error budget
Example circuit: precision
with automatic null offset
A precision-design error budget
Component errors amplifier
The unregulated supply
ac line components 326
Transformer 328
dc components 329
Voltage references
Zener diodes
Bandgap (VBE) reference
Three-terminal and four-terminal regulators
Three-terminal regulators
Three-terminal adjustable regulators
Additional comments about 3-terminal regulators
Switching regulators and dc-dc converters
Special-purpose power-supply circuits
High-voltage regulators
Low-noise, low-drift supplies
Micropower regulators
Flying-capacitor (charge pump) voltage converters
Constant-current supplies
Commercial power-supply modules
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Bad circuits
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 7
Differential and instrumentation
PRECISION CIRCUITS AND LOW-NOISE

Amplifier input errors
Amplifier output errors
Auto-zeroing (chopper-stabilized) amplifiers
Differencing amplifier
Standard three-op-amp
instrumentation amplifier
Amplifier nois
Origins and kinds of noise
Signal-to-noise ratio and noise figure
Transistor amplifier voltage and current noise
Low-noise design with transistors
FET noise
Selecting low-noise transistors
Noise in differential and feedback amplifiers
Noise measurements and noise sources
Measurement without a noise source
Measurement of noise source
Noise and signal sources
Bandwidth limiting and rms voltage measurement
Noise potpourri
Interference: shielding and grounding
Interference
Signal grounds
Grounding between instruments
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 8
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

Basic logic concepts
Digital versus analog
Logic states
Number codes
Gates and truth tables
Discrete circuits for gates
Gate circuit example
Assertion-level logic notation
TTL and CMOS
Catalog of common gates
IC gate circuits
TTL and CMOS characteristics
Three-state and open-collector
devices
Combinational logic
Logic identities
Minimization and Karnaugh maps
Combinational functions available as ICs
Implementing arbitrary truth tables
Sequential logic
Devices with memory: flipflops
Clocked flip-flops
Combining memory and gates: sequential logic
Synchronizer
Monostable multivibrators
One-shot characteristics
Monostable circuit example
Cautionary notes about monostable
Timing with counters
Sequential functions available as ICs
Latches and registers
Counters
Shift registers
Sequential PALS
Miscellaneous sequential functions
Some typical digital circuits
Modulo-n counter: a timing example
Multiplexed LED digital display
Sidereal telescope drive
An n-pulse generator
Logic pathology
dc problems
Switching problems
Congenital weaknesses of TTL and CMOS
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Bad circuits
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 9
DIGITAL MEETS ANALOG

CMOS and TTL logic interfacing
Logic family chronology
Input and output characteristics
Interfacing between logic families
Driving CMOS amd TTL inputs
Driving digital logic from comparators and op-amps
Some comments about logic inputs
Comparators
Driving external digital loads from CMOS and TTL
NMOS LSI interfacing
Opto-electronics
Digital signals and long wires
On-board interconnections
Intercard connections
Data buses
Driving cables
Analog-digital conversion
Introduction to A/D conversion
Digital-to-analog converters (DACs)
Time-domain (averaging) DACs
Multiplying DACs
Choosing a DAC
Analog-to-digital converters
Charge-balancing techniques
Some unusual AID and DIA converters
Choosing an ADC
Some AID conversion examples
16-Channel AID data-acquisition system
3+-~i~it voltmeter
Coulomb meter
Phase-locked loops
Introduction to phase-locked loops
PLL design
Design example: frequency multiplier
PLL capture and lock
Some PLL applications
Pseudo-random bit sequences and noise generation
Digital noise generation
Feedback shift register sequences
Analog noise generation from maximal-length sequences
Power spectrum of shift register sequences
Low-pass filtering
Wrap-up
Digital filters
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Bad circuits
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 10
MICROCOMPUTERS

Minicomputers, microcomputers, and microprocessors
Computer architecture
A computer instruction set
Assembly language and machine language
Simplified 808618 instruction set
A programming example
Bus signals and interfacing
Fundamental bus signals: data, address, strobe
Programmed 110: data out
Programmed I/O: data in
Programmed 110: status registers
Interrupts
Interrupt handling
Interrupts in general
Direct memory access
Summary of the IBM PC’s bus signals
Synchronous versus asynchronous bus communication
Other microcomputer buses
Connecting peripherals to the computer
Software system concepts
7 Programming
Operating systems, files, and use of memory
Data communications concepts
Serial communication and ASCII
Parallel communication:
Centronics, SCSI, IPI,
GPIB (488)
Local area networks
Interface example: hardware data
packing
Number formats

CHAPTER 11
MICROPROCESSORS

A detailed look at the 68008
Registers, memory, and I/O
Instruction set and
addressing
Machine-language representation
Bus signals
A complete design example: analog
the signal averager
Circuit design
Programming: defining the task
Programming: details
Performance
Some afterthoughts
Microprocessor support chips
Medium-scale integration
Peripheral LSI chips
Memory
Other microprocessors

CHAPTER 12
ELECTRONIC CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES

Prototyping methods
Breadboards
PC prototyping boards
Wire-Wrap panels Printed circuits
PC board fabrication
PC board design
Stuffing PC boards
Some further thoughts on PC boards
Advanced techniques
Instrument construction
Housing circuit boards in an instrument Cabinets
Construction Hints
Cooling
Some electrical hints
Where to get components

CHAPTER 13
HIGH-FREQUENCY AND HIGH-SPEED TECHNIQUES

High-frequency amplifiers
Transistor amplifiers at high frequencies: first look
A high-frequency calculation example
High-frequency amplifier configurations
A wideband design example
Some refinements to the ac model
The shunt-series pair
Modular amplifiers
systems, Radiofrequency circuit elements
logic analyzers, and evaluation boards
Transmission lines
Stubs, baluns, and transformers
Tuned amplifiers
Radiofrequency circuit elements
Measuring amplitude or power
Radiofrequency communications: AM
Some communications concepts
Amplitude modulation
Superheterodyne receiver
Advanced modulation methods
Single sideband
Frequency modulation
Frequency-shift keying
Pulse-modulation schemes
Radiofrequency circuit tricks
Special construction techniques
Exotic RF amplifiers and devices
High-speed switching
Transistor model and equations
Analog modeling tools
Some switching-speed examples
High-voltage driver
Open-collector bus driver
Example: photomultiplier preamp
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas
Additional exercises

CHAPTER 14
LOW-POWER DESIGN

Introduction
Low-power applications
Power sources
Battery types
Wall-plug-in units
Solar cells
Signal currents
Power switching and micropower regulators
Power switching
Micropower regulators
Ground reference
Micropower voltage references and temperature sensors
Linear micropower design techniques
Problems of micropower linear design
Discrete linear design example
Micropower operational amplifiers
Micropower comparators
Micropower timers and oscillators
Micropower digital design
CMOS families
Keeping CMOS low power
Micropower microprocessors and peripherals
Microprocessor design example: degree-day logger
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas

CHAPTER 15
MEASUREMENTS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING

Overview
Measurement transducers
Temperature
Light level
Strain and displacement
Acceleration, pressure, force, velocity
Magnetic field
Vacuum gauges
Particle detectors
Biological and chemical voltage probes
Precision standards and precision measurement
Frequency standards
Frequency, period, and time interval measurements
Voltage and resistance standards and measurements
Bandwidth-narrowing techniques
The problem of signal-to-noise ratio
Signal averaging and multichannel averaging
Making a signal periodic
Lock-in detection
Pulse-height analysis
Time-to-amplitude converters
Spectrum analysis and Fourier transforms
Spectrum analyzers
Off-line spectrum analysis
Self-explanatory circuits
Circuit ideas

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